Harassment is defined as verbal or physical conduct that shows hostility against individuals on the basis of one of the protected classes: race, color, national origin, age, nationality, religion, gender, marital status, sexual orientation or disability.

If an employee engages in conduct such as jokes, slurs, stereotyping, emails, printed materials or posters, touching, bullying, threats, put-downs or any other action that shows an aversion to one of these groups then they are committing harassment and the organization can be liable for damages in court.

Keep yourself from harassment in the workplace by following these guidelines:

Harassment can reduce productivity and morale, and put the organization in jeopardy law. All workplaces should have a comprehensive sexual harassment employee training program in place that trains employees how to avoid harassment.

Think about the effects of your actions. Harassment belittles and makes the victim feel inferior. Most people don’t want to make a co-worker feel this way. They simply act without thinking and simply assume their actions won’t bother anyone. If there is a chance that something you say will hurt another person, then don’t say it. Think first.

Stay away from dangerous subjects.  If pictures, jokes or slurs involve any of the above classes, then don’t say it! It might be perfectly OK to joke with a pregnant friend about how big she has become, but to a co-worker this type of talk is strictly off limits.

Do not let peer pressure cause you to act in ways that you normally would not act. The pressure to fit in and not go against the actions of a group begins in school and it doesn’t end when we are adults.

 These pressures have to be avoided at work or you may find yourself in the middle of a harassment suit. Ask yourself if you are going to behave like this in front of your children. If the answer is no, then it may not be OK in the workplace. This is a dead giveaway.

Did you know that the social service industry and healthcare industry experience the most workplace violence? Workplace violence can be described as a threat of physical aggression, intimidation, harassment, or other types of disruptive behaviour that may occur in the workplace. The level of violence can range from empty threats to bloodshed. This can include verbal abuse or even murder. It is not limited to just employees but also including customers, clients, and visitors.

Training

Employee training is very important because it is not enough just to have a plan. The plan should be communicated to the employees and they should have an articulated strategy. Training is the key factor for a safe working environment. If you take a look at how many cases of workplace violence are reported each year, you would realize that proper training should not be ignored at any cost. You can find more on employee harassment training through https://harassmentalert.com/workplace-sexual-harassment-examples-and-how-to-prevent-harassment-in-the-workplace/

Types of violence in the workplace

There are mainly four types of workplace violence that occur. This list is according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

  1. Violence directed at employees by customers, students, patients, prisoners, clients, or others to whom the organization providing the service.
  2. The act of violence committed by criminals who have no connection to the workplace, but they entered the working premise to commit robbery or any other type of crime.
  3. Violence perpetrated at the workplace by someone who does not work there but, having relationships with employees as an abusive spouse or domestic partner.
  4. The violence that is committed against supervisors, co-workers, or managers by a present or an ex employee of the company.